Clavering Primary School

  1. Learning
  2. CLAVERING CURRICULUM: YEARS 1-6
  3. Geography

Introduction

  • A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives.
  • Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.
  • As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments.
  • Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Aims of the Clavering Curriculum for Geography

The Clavering Curriculum for Geography aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes;
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time;
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
    • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
    • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS);
    • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Learning Foci for Geography 

1. To investigate places. 

2. To investigate patterns, processes and sustainability.

3. To communicate geographically.

Topics studied in each year group

Year 1:

Where do I live?

To be able to name and locate the United Kingdom and the seven continents and five oceans of the world on a world map; to be able to name and locate the countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and the surrounding seas on a map; to be able to identify human and physical features of the countries of the United Kingdom; to explore the town we live in; and to be able to describe and locate exactly where you live.

Around the world

To be able to locate Europe on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of France; to be able to locate Asia on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of China; to be able to locate Australasia/Oceania on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of Australia; to be able to locate Africa on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of Kenya; to be able to locate North America on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of the USA; to be able to locate South America on a world map and explore the features and characteristics of Brazil; and to be able to locate Antarctica on a world map and explore some of its features.

Life in the city

To identify what a city is and identify some major capital cities around the world; to explore the features of a city; to compare and contrast the physical features of two cities; to compare and contrast the physical features of two cities; and to explore symbols and patterns used to create maps.

Year 2:

My world and me

To locate the seven continents and five oceans on a world map; to locate the United Kingdom on a world map; to locate the equator, the Tropic of Cancer, the Tropic of Capricorn, the North Pole and the South Pole on a world map and begin to understand their significance; to compare the land features and climate of the UK and another country; to compare and contrast the capital cities of the UK and another country; to understand why different animals live in different parts of the world and how they are adapted for the different climates; to identify physical and human features in aerial photos; and to create a map with a key.

Let’s go on safari!

To locate Africa on a world map and identify the country of Kenya; to explore the climate and weather of Kenya; to explore the animals of Kenya and what geographical features they need to survive; to be able to use compass points to navigate around a map; to explore the landscapes of Kenya; and to find out about the people and culture of Kenya.

Map makers

To be able to use compass points to navigate around a map; to use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise and create landmarks; to use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and surroundings; to devise a simple map and use and construct basic symbols in a key; to design a map, referring to key human features; and to create a 3D map using their town designs.

Year 3:

Our European neighbours

To be able to locate Europe on a world map and find out about its features; to be able to identify and locate countries in Europe; to be able to identify European countries according to their features; to be able to identify the major capital cities of Europe; to be able to compare two European capital cities; and to find out about the human and physical features of a European country.

In the desert

To find out what deserts are and where in the world they are located; to investigate the weather and climate of deserts; to find out about desert formations; to find out how deserts are used by humans; to find out about people who live in the deserts; and to find out about the causes and effects of desertification.

Earning a living

To explore jobs and why they are important; to be able to group jobs into sectors; to explore industries of the UK; to find out how people earn a living in other parts of the world; to find out about unemployment and its effects; and to find out about children around the world who help earn a living for their families.

Year 4:

Village settlers

To find out about the needs of early settlers and the origins of place names; to be able to identify settlements and reasons for their original siting; to be able to identify a range of mapping symbols and know their meanings; to understand and describe how settlements are connected; and to be able to design a village settlement influenced by physical features and personal choice.

The rainforest

To find out what a rainforest is and where they are found; to explore the layers (strata) of vegetation in a rainforest; to investigate the climate of the rainforest; to find out about the people and settlements of the rainforest; and to explore how and why the rainforest is under threat and the measures takes to protect it?

Where does our food come from?

To understand that the food we eat comes from many different places around the world; to know how land in temperate climate zones is used to produce food; to know how land in tropical climate zones is used to produce food; to describe the way in which land in tropical biomes is being changed to enable more food to be produced; to explore how food is produced in Mediterranean climate zones; to explain how land is used to produce food in the UK; and to understand and describe trade links that enable food from around the world to be sold in the UK.

Year 5:

The United Kingdom

To be able to identify and describe key geographical features of the UK; to be able to identify and locate the counties of the UK; to be able to identify towns and cities in the UK; to find out about the hills and mountains of the UK; to find out about the seas and coasts of the UK; and to be able to identify and explore the major rivers of the UK.

North America

To identify the countries of North America; to explore the capital cities of North America; to investigate and compare climates in North America; to explore some of the key human and physical geographical features of North America; to explore the various time zones of North America and how these compare to other time zones around the world; to compare a region of the UK with a region in North America; and to research the human and physical geography of a chosen North American country.

Investigating rivers and coasts

To understand and explain the water cycle; to find out about rivers and how they erode, transport and deposit materials; to find out why rivers are important; to find out about the causes of river pollution and the effect it has on the environment; to find out what coasts are and how they are formed; to find out about the physical features of coasts and the processes of erosion that affect them; and to explore different strategies for coastal management.

Year 6:

Extreme Earth

To find out about the Earth’s climate and areas of extreme temperatures; to revise learning about the water cycle and understand the distribution of water around the world; to find out about extreme weather conditions across the world; to find out about earthquakes and what causes them; to find out about tsunamis and how they are caused; and to find out what volcanoes are and how they are formed.

South America

To find out about the location and countries of South America; to find out about the climate in South America; to find out about the major mountain ranges of South America; to find out about the human geography of South America; to find out about trade and industry in South America; and to research the human and physical geography of a chosen South American country.

Our local area

To explore economic activity, land use, settlements, climate zones, rivers and upland areas as part of a local area study.