Clavering Primary School

  1. Learning
  2. CLAVERING CURRICULUM: YEARS 1-6
  3. History Curriculum

CLAVERING CURRICULUM FOR HISTORY

For more information, please contact Mr McAvoy (Deputy Headteacher), Mrs Corr (Humantities Leader) and/or your child's/children's teacher(s).

Introduction

  • A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world.
  • It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past.
  • Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.
  • History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Aims of the Clavering Curriculum for History

The Clavering Curriculum for History aims to ensure that all pupils: 

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world;
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind;
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’;
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses;
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed;
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Clavering Learning Foci for History

1. To understand chronology.

2. To investigate and interpret the past.

3. To communicate historically.

4. To build an overview of history.

Topics studied in each year group

Year 1

Changes in living memory: How and why are our toys different from those in living memory? (revealing aspects of change in national life)

Significant historical figures: Why do we remember Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole?

Changes in living memory: How and why are our holidays different from those in living memory? (revealing aspects of change in national life)

Year 2

Changes in the last hundred years: How and why have household objects changed in the last hundred years? (revealing aspects of change in national life)

Event beyond living memory: What was the Great Fire of London and how do we know about it?

Significant historical figures and local historical figure and events: Why and how do we remember Captain James Cook and Neil Armstrong?

Year 3

World history 1a: Where and when were the earliest civilisations and what were their main achievements? (overview)

World history 1b: What can we find out about the achievements of the ancient Egyptians from what has survived?

British history 1: How did life change in ancient Britain from the New Stone Age to the Iron Age?

British history 2: What was the impact of the Roman invasion of Britain?

Year 4

British history 3: What motivated the Anglo-Saxons, Picts and Scots to settle in Britain?

British history 4: How did the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for power affect the Kingdom of England?

Year 5

British history 5a: Introduction to the First World War (overview)

British (and local) history 5b: Why do people in Hartlepool still remember the 1914 bombardment?

World history 2: What was everyday life like for the Mayan people (c. AD 900) and how did this compare to life in the UK at this time?

British history 6: How did life change in the UK during the Victorian era?

Year 6

World history 3: How have the ancient Greeks’ achievements influenced the western world?

British history 7a: Introduction to the Second World War (overview)

British history 7b: What was life like for different groups in the UK as a result of the Second World War?

British history 8: What can we learn from ‘Our Migration Story’: the making of the UK?

Overview, depth studies and the long arc

In planning to ensure progression through teaching the British, local and world history outlined in the National Curriculum, overview and depth studies need to be combined to help pupils understand both the long arc of development and the complexity of specific aspects of the content. Each unit has a set of increasingly-challenging enquiry questions that must be researched as part of each unit. The long arc at Clavering is toys. This begins in the ‘How and why are our toys different from those in living memory?’ depth topic in Year 1 and is then built on during most subsequent units with the children answering two additional enquiry questions: ‘What toys did children play with during this period, how did they change over time and how do we know? and ‘How do toys during this period compare with previous periods studied?

Unit questions and lines of enquiry

Every depth study within the Clavering Curriculum for History has an overarching unit question and then set lines of enquiry.

For example, in Year 2, one of the depth studies if focuses on significant historical figures and the impact of exploration. The unit question is 'Significant historical figures and local historical figure and events: Why and how do we remember Captain James Cook and Neil Armstrong?' Within this depth study, there

  • Who was Captain James Cook and what is he most famous for?
  • How do we know about how Captain James Cook travelled and explored the world?
  • What were the most significant achievements of Captain James Cook’s explorations?
  • Who was Neil Armstrong and what is he most famous for?
  • In your opinion, who had the more significant impact on travel and exploration: Captain James Cook or Neil Armstrong?
  • Historically, have explorers been discoverers or colonisers?
  • Why and in what ways do different people view explorers from the past?

This practice is consistent throughout every depth study from Year 1 to Year 6. For more information, please contact Mr McAvoy (Deputy Headteacher), Mrs Corr (Humantities Leader) and/or your child's/children's teacher(s).

Decolonising the curriculum / Teaching black history / Black Lives Matter

At Clavering, we are passionate about being loudly anti-racist as opposed to just being non-racist. Within our history curriculum, there are lots of examples of where we teach black history; where we tackle racism; and where we challenge previous opinions about historical figures and actions. This crucial thread of our history curriculum is interwoven throughout the school with various lines of enquiry, including:

  • How and why have Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole been remembered over time and how and why has this changed?
  • Historically, have explorers been discoverers or colonisers? Why and in what ways do different people view explorers from the past?
  • Who was the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady’ and how does she change our perception of the history of Black Britain?
  • What was the Slave Trade? Why was the Slave Trade really abolished and who should really take the credit? What was the affect of the 1833 Slavery Abolition Act on the subsequent reign of Queen Victoria?
  • How did the British Empire expand during the Victorian era and what are some of the different views of this expansion and its legacy?
  • What was the contribution of non-white British soldiers and African, Caribbean and Asian troops fighting for Britain? Why is this contribution often overlooked?

Issues linked to prejudice appear throughout our history curriculum and the theme of migration develops throughout Key Stage 2, concluding in our final Year 6 unit: 'British history 8: What can we learn from Our Migration Story’: the making of the UK?' The lines of enquiry for this unit go right back to learning about the Romans (in Year 3) and Anglo-Saxons and Vikings (in Year 4) all the way up to the present day:

  • From the early migration stories that you have studied previously, who do you think had the most significant impact on Britain: the Romans, the Anglo-Saxons or the Vikings?
  • Who were some of the Black Britons that made an important contribution to life in Britain during the period that you have studied in British history and what forms of discrimination did they suffer? (examples include Olaudah Equiano – linked to Y5, William Cuffay – linked to Y5, Mary Seacole – linked to Y1 and Walter Tull – linked to Y5)
  • What was the effect of Irish immigration and Jewish immigration in the 19th Century and what forms of discrimination did they suffer?
  • What do you think have been the most significant effects of immigration in the UK in the last one hundred years? How and why has immigration been interpreted differently?
  • What evidence is there that racism is improving in Britain?